Indoor Humidity Changes

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kholmseth
Pool Newbie
Pool Newbie
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri 27 May, 2016 13:19
My Pool: Indoor heated pool - vinyl lining, sand filter, built in 1977

Indoor Humidity Changes

Postby kholmseth » Sat 28 May, 2016 10:55

We have an indoor heated pool that stays between 80-85 degrees right now without turning on the heater, due to higher outdoor temps. It has a solar blanket cover on it, at all times. Lately, our indoor humidity has been going up to 60% or a little higher on days that it's been raining. (the outdoor humidity is 87% or so). On these days, we are able to control the indoor humidity with both a ceiling dehumidifier fan system (honeywell), and a regular floor unit dehumidifier to about 55-58%. We cannot get it any lower than this on rainy days. When it's dry, it drops back down to 48-50% with no problem. We are concerned that if it continues to rain, this will be a mold-growth problem. Are these humidity ranges an area of concern? We are new owners to this home, and we were told to keep it between 40-50%, but it's been a challenge. I feel like we may need to invest in a whole-home dehumidification system, but we don't want to spend that amount of money...Thanks for any advice!


pedro12
Pool Newbie
Pool Newbie
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed 06 Apr, 2016 06:15

Re: Indoor Humidity Changes

Postby pedro12 » Mon 04 Jul, 2016 04:52

i would recommend you to create some ventilation space it will decrease humidity
paulbest
Swimming Pool Wizard
Swimming Pool Wizard
Posts: 72
Joined: Wed 20 Jul, 2016 05:45

Re: Indoor Humidity Changes

Postby paulbest » Tue 02 Aug, 2016 23:01

:wave: hello there! I totally understand that you don't want to spend costly dehumidifiers but here's what I can highly recommend:

1. create ventilation, as much as possible acquire fresh air moving around the humid area. this is one of the reason why closed areas get wet which results to mold and mildew infestations of your pool. this is because vapors are being collected and air cannot escape. by making a ventilation simply using fans or windows, it helps the air to circulate.

2. you can also use CARBON CHLORIDE to remove moisture from the air. these compound attracts strongly to water and with that, it soak up as twice its own weight making it a very effective and useful drying product in regards of dehumidifying pool area in times of rainy season.
odbob
Pool Enthusiast
Pool Enthusiast
Posts: 25
Joined: Tue 12 Jul, 2016 02:31
My Pool: British 30ft x 8ft x 4ft deep indoor pool, I micron bag filter, 3kw electric heater, maintained at 31.5 degC all year round
Location: UK midlands

Re: Indoor Humidity Changes

Postby odbob » Wed 03 Aug, 2016 03:19

I can see your concern, mainly due to advise of 40 to 50%, and with outside humidity in the order of 87%, to me, it would seem counter productive to draw in any more air through ventilation as has been suggested. I am surprised that you were advised of 40 to 50% as this is a pretty low figure, my pool area is typically in the region of 60%, rising to 80% following a swimming activity and we suffer absolutely no mold growth. I should say at this point, that our pool cabin is extremely well insulated and so where mold growth would normally occur, around the perimeter walls, the internal wall temperature is virtually the same as the air temperature and so no condensate forms. To me circulating the internal air and so air circulation fans within the area would be the way I would go, but I also think that your experience of 60% plus is not something to unduly worry about, that said, every situation is different and so keep an eye on it, don't let mold growth occur
odbob
Pool Enthusiast
Pool Enthusiast
Posts: 25
Joined: Tue 12 Jul, 2016 02:31
My Pool: British 30ft x 8ft x 4ft deep indoor pool, I micron bag filter, 3kw electric heater, maintained at 31.5 degC all year round
Location: UK midlands

Re: Indoor Humidity Changes

Postby odbob » Wed 03 Aug, 2016 08:35

I need also to say that if your dehumidifiers are in good working order, and from your observations, they seem to be, ventilation to the outside air would be totally counter productive.

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