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New owner

New pool owner

Postby New owner » Tue 02 Aug, 2005 12:41

Hi. My husband an I moved to our first house in December, which has an inground swimming pool. It is the firts time we have a pool. It was already winterized when we bought the house. We have 2 children, 5 and 2years old, and since the pool is not gated ( it is in the backyard though) and right next to our kids play area, we decided not to open it this year until we get it gated or fenced for safety sake.
My question is, should we Re-winterize or something to keep it in good condition till next season? . I am in Boston, Massachussets so temperatures can get as high as 100 degrees in summer and as low as single digits in winter ( if it matters in anyway to what should be done to the pool ).
thanks!!


Gov
Pool Care Proficient
Pool Care Proficient
Posts: 52
Joined: Mon 30 May, 2005 17:01
Location: Michgan, USA

New pool owner

Postby Gov » Tue 02 Aug, 2005 18:10

I wouldn't wait until next season to start treating your water.
My bet is you already have algae.
The cold winter temps keep the algae away, the winterizing just helps until then.
With this hot summer we have been having, you probably have algae growth, I would wait until next year or it will be a nightmare when you open it.
Go to your local pool store and find out how much shock you need for your size pool and then pour some in.
See what they suggest also.
New owner

thanks

Postby New owner » Tue 02 Aug, 2005 19:40

thanks for your reply GOV , but in your opinion, since i will not use the pool this season and as you said it is getting really hot ( and we're still in early August, so there is more hot weather on the way), should I wait till the normal closing time and do whatever is necessary? or would you advice cleaning it now before it gets worse and then give it another clean up before winter?
Thanks again.
Guest

Postby Guest » Thu 04 Aug, 2005 05:19

I would clean that pool now. When I moved into my house the pool sat most of the summer, It took several days of vacuuming, backwashing and refilling pool. It is a pain to try to clean a pool when you cant see the bottom of the pool because it looks like a lawn. I would shock it, let the filter run non stop for a day and start vaccuming. Then check the P.H., Alkalinity and stabilizer..
Gov
Pool Care Proficient
Pool Care Proficient
Posts: 52
Joined: Mon 30 May, 2005 17:01
Location: Michgan, USA

New pool owner

Postby Gov » Fri 05 Aug, 2005 17:15

I would do what you can now, then re-winterize it again in the fall.
Guest

New pool owner

Postby Guest » Mon 05 Sep, 2005 08:58

I would definitely get to work on that pool now. I moved into my current house in 1998, and inherited a pool which had been neglected for over two years. It took me several days to get the pool into a usable state.

If you have time, get into a daily routine now !

Get hold of a simple, reliable test kit for pH and chlorine - the little multi-way strips are fine.

Check pH and free chlorine - aim for 7.4 - 7.6 for the pH BEFORE you start adding chlorine. Use pH Increaser or Reducer to adjust. Chlorine works best in the 7.4 - 7.6 pH range.

Once the pH is stable, and in range, use Stabilized chlorine as a matter of choice; it lasts longer in the sun. Shock chlorine can be used for routine sanitization too, but it tends to be degraded more rapidly.

Aim for at least 1ppm free chlorine, but keep it below 4ppm EXCEPT when shocking the pool. Aim to shock every two weeks or so - this will help eliminate the chloramines which form when chlorine binds itself to organic contaminants in your pool. DON'T ALLOW BATHERS IN THE POOL UNTIL THE FREE CHLORINE HAS FALLEN BACK TO 4PPM OR LESS - THIS SHOULD HAPPEN WITHIN A FEW HOURS.

Invest in a good algaecide; use an initial loading dose, then follow up with routine dosing as recommended on the container.

Check pH and chlorine daily, and adjust as required.

If you have a pool vac, use it regularly to remove debris from the bottom of the pool. Many pool owners run their recirculation pumps and filters constantly, or for a good part of each day at least. The filter won't remove contaminating organisms, but it will remove suspended material.

An occasional treatment with flocculant will keep the water nice and clear.

If your water is really dirty, it may be necessary to backwash your filter every day or so during the recovery process; you should also keep an eye on your skimmer baskets and pump pre-filters - these fill up rapidly if there is a lot of debris, and your vac will simply grind to a halt.

If you encounter any specific problems, post here again.

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