Restore a filled in pool

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richardclightner
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Joined: Thu 27 Jun, 2013 02:59

Restore a filled in pool

Postby richardclightner » Thu 27 Jun, 2013 03:45

A valuable post with very valuable information. Your discussion is quite good and imparts knowledge to all the readers. After reading this i felt my self full of knowledge in relation to this topic. I have a small pool in my backyard for my children. You can call it as a tub. Due to stored water it's color is fading away day by day. I want to get it redone to make it more joyful for the children. Is tub refinishing possible? What are the options which I can use while getting it redone.? Please reply asap.. :)Thank you..!! :)


Ray1031
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Joined: Sun 24 Sep, 2006 01:49

Restore a filled in pool

Postby Ray1031 » Thu 27 Jun, 2013 12:54

Richard,

I am afraid the you have not really supplied enough information for a truly good response. You have stated only that it is a small pool, which could practically called a tub, primarily for use by children. However, you have not mentioned what the pool is made of ... any recommended corrective actions must be tailored to fit the pool type.

* For a liner pool, the only real way to restore color fading to a pool is to replace the liner.

* for a plaster finish pool, the most effective/long lasting method is replastering - although "white" is the most common finishing color, any plaster can have a coloring agent mixed in. A local man had one redone in his College colors by this method.

* if it is a fiberglass pool (a one piece fiberglass shell - like those used in most spa/hot tubs - dropped into a hole in the ground), you have a few options: Through working with portable spas/hot tubs, I know that a lot of the color "hazing" of fiberglass tubs is either caused by material deposits on the surface (these may not really be visible, but can often be "felt" by sensitive fingertips), or it sun "leeching" of the surface coloring - just like on a pool liner. However, unlike a pool liner, a fiberglass shell can usually be saved - often without really expensive resurfacing methods. First, I would try a really good surface cleaner, your pool or a hot tub supplier can recommend a good one. My recommendation here is to first try it in a small spot in as isolated a spot as possible. This way, if it either does not work or possibly exacerbates the problem, you can stop. If it is "sun hazing/fading" of the surface color, then it can be "sanded" out if it is a good quality surface. HOWEVER, I would not recommend attacking it with standard grade sanding papers. They are often too coarse and cut too deeply. You need to finesse the job somewhat. Spa manufacturers/stores usually have what they call a surface repair kit specifically aimed at this type of job. The specific one I am most familiar with is made by a company called MicroMesh and is a Spa Surface Repair Kit. It contains sanding cloths starting at about 400/600 grit and going all the way to 1200/1400 grit and a bottle of surface restorer/polish. You start with the coarser grits because you are not only removing the top layer of "color" but also a protective coating on top of it. Again, working in a small, unobtrusive area, try sanding down to brighter color. Check your work by rinsing frequently and stop as soon as you reach the color you desire - so you don't wear through to the uncolored layers beneath. If you begin seeing "uncolored" or differently colored layers, you can stop immediately with only minimal damage.

The final option for a fiberglass pool is something I usually recommend to people who have "damaged" (ie, cracked/holed) pool surfaces. That is to contact a local "marine specialist". You know, a boat hull repair place. Not only are they completely familiar with fiberglass repair, they are also equipped to do color matching/altering for boat hulls.

For other surfaces ... I will need to know what type of surface it is. I have seen/worked on many different pools over the years. Everything from homemade wood or concrete block construction up to and including a 30 x 50 cast iron number that began it's life as a dip tank for horse stock.

Ray1031
Ray10311 is an experienced pool professional with 25 years experience
novapool
Pool Newbie
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Posts: 1
Joined: Sun 29 Nov, 2015 13:31
My Pool: filled in, oval

Re: Restore a filled in pool

Postby novapool » Sun 29 Nov, 2015 13:44

I recently purchased a house with a filled in concrete pool outside Washington DC. Neighbors do not think the shell was punctured but we're not entirely sure. I would like to restore the pool to use if at all possible without paying the cost of digging out the old pool shell and putting in an entirely new one.

Is there someone in the area who I should consult who could help me execute on this plan?
JoeHam

Re: Restore a filled in pool

Postby JoeHam » Mon 30 Nov, 2015 13:00

You could try something like this:

https://www.google.com/search?q=pool+repair+Washington+DC

and get at least 3 written quotes. Don't forget to ask for references and call a few at random.

Joe
EllenBaker
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Joined: Sat 17 Sep, 2016 06:17

Re: Restore a filled in pool

Postby EllenBaker » Sat 17 Sep, 2016 06:26

Online site might help you to give you all the details.
bharris8203

Re: Restore a filled in pool

Postby bharris8203 » Wed 26 Oct, 2016 14:38

Any luck? I just bought a house with a pool filled with dirt in the DC area as well.

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