Pump overheating

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stevek

Over Heating

Postby stevek » Fri 23 May, 2008 19:52

I just replaced my 3/4 hp hayward today with a 3/4 AO and having the same problem. In additon to this the pump is cycling(?), turning off and on but not like when it over heats and changes speeds. Any suggestions? The wiring was fine for the last 3/4 pump. Should I look at replacing it or is it a pump issue?

Steve


Spotszilla

pump overheating

Postby Spotszilla » Tue 15 Jul, 2008 23:52

Check your electrical connections all the way to the main panel for loose or bad connections. Get a cheap ammeter from harbor freight or borrow one and check your motor amperage. If its higher than the name plate on the motor you need to find the reason its over amping.
terpanther

Postby terpanther » Sat 25 Oct, 2008 12:37

I was having this problem and it was a connection wire inside the pump motor. Pump would run about 10 minutes, overheat and cut itself off. We unplugged everything inside the motor, cleaned them off and replugged them up and so far it is working fine.
eddie43

Pump overheating

Postby eddie43 » Sun 31 May, 2009 11:55

I have a heyward super pump ii and it just burned out after 4yrs. Everything was working good until today.I called the pool experts and they said it probably is just wear and tear.Its gonna costs about 400.00 to replace.
RRich

Pump overheating

Postby RRich » Sun 31 May, 2009 16:16

My motor too, is overheating and recycling on and off intermittently.

A couple of months ago, I found that my pump casing was cracked and leaking profusely. I disconnected and delivered, intact with pump, motor, and trap/strainer assembly, to my local pool supply/service shop. One of the owners happened to have a spare casing [discontinued Dominator], which he swapped and installed along with other needed parts, shaft seal, impeller, and other parts. After reconnection, I noticed that the motor would now shut down and restart intermittently – running approximately 10 to 20 minutes, shutting down, and then resting from 20 to 40 minutes before restarting. I checked the timer mechanism and the timer was still in the on position. I tried to manually reset the timer, but the motor still would not restart, until after it had cooled. I also checked to confirm that the breaker had not been tripped.

•Could the problem possibly be caused by the timer and if so, how can I tell?
•Could a smaller pump impeller or other problem with the pump mechanisms be causing the motor to overheat?
•A new motor might not be the solution.


Please read details below:

When I called the pool supply/service shop again, the owner thought maybe the technician had reset the motor for 220 volts while testing in the shop and suggested that I rewire to 115 volt. I checked and found that the motor was still set to 115 volts. Several weeks later, the owner made a house call, and without running the motor or testing, he immediately diagnosed that I needed a new motor, just based on my description of the problem. The pump repair had already cost me about $299. So, I reluctantly later agreed to purchase a “new” last year’s model A.O. Smith motor - $294 with shaft seal installation.

Before installing, I tested the voltage input and found it fluctuating at between 122 and 124.7 volts at the motor and at the timer. I reset the motor from the factory default of 220 volts to 115 and reconnected. When I powered-on, the motor ran for about 20 to 30 minutes and shut down. I switched the power off at the breaker and later called the repair shop, again. I’ve concluded that apparently, my problem is not with the motor(s), unless the new motor is defective too. So, before you run out and purchase a new motor [or pump] of any brand, I recommend that you be absolutely certain that will solve your problem.

The repair shop sent another technician to the house who found that other than slightly loose connections at the timer, he could find no problem. He noted that the loose connection was not significant enough to have caused a problem. He remained on-site with the motor running for over 20 minutes with his multimeter connected to see if we could observe a spike or drop in the voltage. No change was observed and no other problem was found. He agreed with me that the problem was not in the motor, unless it too was defective. The motor continued to run uninterrupted after he left for up to another 20 to 30 minutes while I continued to monitor.

Hoping that the loose wiring had been the problem, with the motor still running (over 40 minutes now], I went out at about 10:45 am and when I returned at about 2pm, the motor had started recycling again, now running only about 5 to 10 minutes, before shutting off - it was too hot to touch. This was a Friday, with outside temperatures getting up to only about 69 degrees that day. A couple of troubleshooting guides online stated that local electrical supply may drop during periods of high electrical demand and suggested running the pump during the evening [non-peak] hours. I haven’t done so yet and haven’t checked with my local utility company yet either.

The pool was built in the 50’s and we’ve owned the house for about 13 years. We've had an Aqua-Flo Dominator pool pump with 3/4 hp [Model 15907000]for about 8 to 10 years – no heater or other peripherals. The pump motor is connected to an Intermatic [T101R] 24-hour mechanical timer. Until recently, I don’t recall ever having a problem with the motor overheating and shutting down. However, four years ago this month, I replaced the pool timer. I don’t recall now exactly why I replaced the timer, but it kind of seems now that I was having a similar problem with intermittent shut downs, solved by replacing the timer. Could the problem possibly be caused by the timer and if so, how can I tell?. I can't find my notes from that time period.

Our pump pressure normally ran no lower than 18 PSI – sometimes after acid-washing the grids it ran as low as 15 PSI, but never ever lower than 15 and required sometimes weekly backwashing. Since the problem started with the motor, we also decided about 3 weeks ago to replace our old Sta-Rite DE Spin with a new Sta-Rite System3 media filter. After 13 years of inquiring about problem to the pool supply/servicer, one of the owners finally suggested replacing the standard impeller with a smaller one, to compensate for our one-inch filter to pool return line. When we purchased the A.O. Smith motor mentioned above, the pump impeller was changed out at that time. That seemed to solve the pressure problem, as the pressure now has been as low as 9 PSI. It's very noisy though, especially with the Kreepy Krauly connected. Could a smaller pump impeller or other problem with the pump mechanisms be causing the motor to overheat?

Please Help!!!
RRich

Reducing Filter Pressure

Postby RRich » Sun 31 May, 2009 16:50

When I purchased a Kreepy Krauly about six to seven years ago and started performing my own pool maintenance, I started noticing that my filter pressure normally ran no lower than about 18 PSI – sometimes after acid-washing the grids it ran as low as 15 PSI, but only for a few days and never ever lower than 15 and required sometimes weekly backwashing. Sometimes, even backwashing and manually cleaning the filter grids wouldn't bring the pressure down.

At 20 PSI, the Kreepy slows to a mere crawl and stops working all together, though the skimmer will continue to work for a few days with the Kreepy disconnected. Over the years, I've inquired with my local pool supply/service shop several times and was never given a real explanation or solution for the high pressure. Recently, while my pump and motor were in the shop for repair/replacement, I mentioned this issue again and pointed out that the return line was only one inch pipe, as was pointed out to me recently when one of the technicians had been at the house to investigate the problem with the motor. He pointed out that my water return line from the filter to the pool was only one inch pipe, while the line from the pool to the pump was two or 2.5 inchs. He explained how the whole filtration process works and that the difference in pipe size was causing an inordinant amount of pressure to build up in the filter tank, as water couldn't flow out at the appropriate rate in comparison to the rate being pumped in.

The owner suggested replacing the normal-sized pump impeller with a smaller one (I don't remember the sizes). The impeller was changed out and that seemed to solve the problem, as the pressure recently has been as low as 9 PSI. It's very noisy though, especially with the Kreepy Krauly connected, but I'm not sure whether the noise is directly related to the smaller impeller or the new pump motor or other. For now reducing the impeller size seems to have solved my pressure problem and don't know yet whether this change will cause some other filtration component to be out of balance.
grmcgee

Pump overheating

Postby grmcgee » Sun 21 Jun, 2009 18:33

I have read this forum and many others about pool pumps overheating. I have a Hayward Superpump on a 21,000 gal inground pool. The motor is UST1102 (115/230 volts, 1 HP). This setup ran flawlessly for over 12 years, maybe 15 (I am the second owner). My normal mode of pump operation during summer is 24/7. The pump is turned off for only short periods to switch filter modes or start/stop auto cleaner. Last year I had to replace the motor capacitor, after which the motor ran great all summer. This year after about a week of normal operation, the motor has started overheating and cutting off. It runs about 2-4 hours before the thermal switch cuts off operation. There is also a smell of "hot wires" that has never occurred before. After cooling for a few hours, the motor will run normally again for a few more hours. It has always run somewhat hot, but it has never been cut off by the thermal switch until now. I have not checked the voltage/amperage yet, but it doesn't seem likely that is the problem since the exact same setup (an isolated electrical circuit) has run great for so many years. Also, the motor is inside a pump house, protected from the weather with nothing blocking the surrounding air. So the questions to you experts are: Does this mean that my motor is wearing out and I will need to replace it soon? Or is there a chance that I have a power (or other) problem that can be corrected? In other words, it is worth the time to do diagnostics, or should I go ahead and spring for a new motor?
ThisSucks

Pump overheating

Postby ThisSucks » Wed 17 Feb, 2010 20:55

SO my pool pump would only suck at bout 50%. I dug out the line to find a major bend in the flex pvc and a major crack. Fixed the line. Now it sucks at 100% but the motor overheats at about 4 min. The extra load i'm guesing is causing it. Motor never overheated when it ran at 50%. I even ran it 24 hours straight and no problem. So problem solving time. Asked around, checked online. Concensus was that the motor was bad due to running at half pull for so long. REplaced the motor. And guess what, same problem. Overheated in like 3 minutes. So now i'm debating whether it is the filter or i have a clogged line which is causeing the load. I don't think its the wiring since the pump ran for months fine at half pull. Anyone have any ideas? thanks
poolpumpguy

Over Heating

Postby poolpumpguy » Thu 18 Feb, 2010 13:37

stevek wrote:I just replaced my 3/4 hp hayward today with a 3/4 AO and having the same problem. In additon to this the pump is cycling(?), turning off and on but not like when it over heats and changes speeds. Any suggestions? The wiring was fine for the last 3/4 pump. Should I look at replacing it or is it a pump issue?

Steve

if it is a northstar by hayward that motor is almost a 1.5 hp. you must check the service factor of the old motor. or check your voltage with a meter. a 3/4 could have be set for 115 v. new motors from factory are set for 230 volts
this is a hayward trick they used to make you think you are getting a 3/4 pump that looked as if it pumped as much water as a 1 1/2 pump.. if you don't have the old motor you will need to ID the impeller and start from there.. this is what it sounds like to me..... or bring your pump in to your local pool pump motor repair guy with free motor testing and have him help you .. good luck
waspa
Pool Newbie
Pool Newbie
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri 05 Mar, 2010 21:37
My Pool: I have a 1994 Caldera 6-person Hot tub and the two pumps in it are sta-rite. It has a blaboa top-side control panel. The blower is a waterway.
Location: Washington State

Pump overheating

Postby waspa » Fri 05 Mar, 2010 22:14

Hi there, I am new to this forum and I don't have a pool. I have a Caldera Hot Tub and we are having the same problem with our pump motor overheating. It is a sta-rite 2 1/3 hp, it will run great for a little while and then shut off until it cools sown then will come back on. A few days ago my husband went out to heat it up and the control panel was displaying the "flo" and the temp read at 50 degrees. We initially thought it was the heater, but it tested fine. I talked to a hot tub tech and was told that there is a thermal couple in the motor that is probably bad. I can not find this particular part and all the schematics of this particular pump I can not find this part. Do we need to replace the whole motor? Can we just replace that piece and if so, where is it???? Any suggestions? Any other ideas on what else could be causing this problem?
Thanks :?

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