FC vs CYA levels

Chlorinating, maintaining the right chlorine levels,
chlorine problems. Dichlor, trichlor, cal hypo, bleach,
granules, chlorine pucks and chlorine sticks.
fjdavid
Pool Newbie
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Posts: 4
Joined: Fri 25 Jul, 2008 16:19

FC vs CYA levels

Postby fjdavid » Wed 30 Jul, 2008 12:34

I've been reading a lot on this forum about pool chemistry and the one thing i haven't found is how to determine what my FC level should be based on my CYA level. I've seen people recommend a change to one or the other or both but if I'm in an acceptable range on one, how do I determine what the other should be?

for example:
FC = 2.5
PH = 7.4
TA = 70
CH = 300
CYA = 45ppm

What should my FC be for that CYA? is there a chart somewhere or is it from experience?

Thanks
Frank


Guest

Re: FC vs CYA levels

Postby Guest » Wed 30 Jul, 2008 16:50

www(dot)troublefreepooldot)com(slash)category(slash)pool-school(slash)chlorine_cya_chart_shock

fjdavid wrote:I've been reading a lot on this forum about pool chemistry and the one thing i haven't found is how to determine what my FC level should be based on my CYA level. I've seen people recommend a change to one or the other or both but if I'm in an acceptable range on one, how do I determine what the other should be?

for example:
FC = 2.5
PH = 7.4
TA = 70
CH = 300
CYA = 45ppm

What should my FC be for that CYA? is there a chart somewhere or is it from experience?

Thanks
Frank
Guest

Re: FC vs CYA levels

Postby Guest » Wed 30 Jul, 2008 16:52

www(dot)troublefreepool(dot)com(slash)category(slash)pool-school(slash)chlorine_cya_chart_shock

Anonymous wrote:www(dot)troublefreepooldot)com(slash)category(slash)pool-school(slash)chlorine_cya_chart_shock

fjdavid wrote:I've been reading a lot on this forum about pool chemistry and the one thing i haven't found is how to determine what my FC level should be based on my CYA level. I've seen people recommend a change to one or the other or both but if I'm in an acceptable range on one, how do I determine what the other should be?

for example:
FC = 2.5
PH = 7.4
TA = 70
CH = 300
CYA = 45ppm

What should my FC be for that CYA? is there a chart somewhere or is it from experience?

Thanks
Frank
fjdavid
Pool Newbie
Pool Newbie
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri 25 Jul, 2008 16:19

Postby fjdavid » Wed 30 Jul, 2008 19:24

Thanks a lot. that is exactly what I was looking for.

By the way I had severe algae problem a week ago and this forum was a great help. I purchased a Taylor K-2006 test kit based on comments on other posts and I love it. It has been much easier to determine what I need to do to adjust my water balance. It took about a half an hour the first time i did all of the tests. I felt like I was in Chemistry class again but it was easy to follow the instructions.

Frank
Guest

Postby Guest » Thu 31 Jul, 2008 01:46

Happy to help. You're right, a good test kit makes all the difference. The Taylor K-2006 is actually better than what many pool stores use to test.

Tim

fjdavid wrote:Thanks a lot. that is exactly what I was looking for.

By the way I had severe algae problem a week ago and this forum was a great help. I purchased a Taylor K-2006 test kit based on comments on other posts and I love it. It has been much easier to determine what I need to do to adjust my water balance. It took about a half an hour the first time i did all of the tests. I felt like I was in Chemistry class again but it was easy to follow the instructions.

Frank
fjdavid
Pool Newbie
Pool Newbie
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri 25 Jul, 2008 16:19

Postby fjdavid » Mon 18 Aug, 2008 17:14

Well, to update you on the condition of my pool. It is crystal clear still and I love the test kit. The one thing that I noticed with the kit is that I will run out of the drops for chlorine and cya testing first. do the chemicals in these kits last for more than an year? Taylor states that they should be refreshed at the start of each year. Is this true? do i need to dump all of the chemicals that I have left at the end of the season and buy new next spring?

I'm talking about the test kit chemicals (drops) not the pool chemicals

thanks,
Frank
chem geek
Pool Industry Leader
Pool Industry Leader
Posts: 2382
Joined: Thu 21 Jun, 2007 21:27
Location: San Rafael, California

Postby chem geek » Mon 18 Aug, 2008 17:48

Most of the chemicals in the test will be good for 2 years. The most sensitive chemicals are the titrating drops in the chlorine test. The next most sensitive are the organic dyes used in the indicators. The DPD powder will degrade if it's exposed to moisture, but keeping it closed except when you briefly get some powder for the test helps. Keeping all chemicals in a cool dark place is good (not the refrigerator, though).

Chemicals such as acids and buffers will last a very long time.

An alternative to the Taylor K-2006 kit that has 36% more volume of reagents is the TF100 kit here -- it uses the same reagents as in the Taylor kit for most tests (the pH test is uses a smaller comparator so has a different concentration of indicator dye).

You can use a 10 ml sample for the chlorine test to get accuracy to 0.5 ppm and save on reagent compared to using a 25 ml sample to get 0.2 ppm accuracy.

Richard

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