Pool Algae Problem Support - READ FIRST

Algae problems in swimming pool water.
Green (cloudy) water or slimy pool walls.
Black algae. Mustard algae. Pink or white pool mold.
chem geek
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Pool Algae Problem Support - READ FIRST

Postby chem geek » Fri 19 Feb, 2010 21:13

perplexed,

You didn't say what your specific Free Chlorine (FC) and Cyanuric Acid (CYA) levels were. Many pool stores will 1) incorrectly measure CYA and 2) consider 100-200 ppm CYA just fine when it isn't. Please post your actual measured numbers and do yourself a favor and get your own good test kit such as the Taylor K-2006 you can get at a good online price here or the TF100 from tftestkits.net here with the latter kit having 36% more volume of reagents so is somewhat comparably priced per test.

If the green is algae, then even with high phosphates you should be able to kill it faster with chlorine than it can grow IF you maintain a sufficient FC/CYA ratio. I suspect that your FC is below 7.5% (maybe even below 5%) of the CYA level.


ScosheOwn
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Pool Algae Problem Support - READ FIRST

Postby ScosheOwn » Tue 01 Jun, 2010 16:35

ChemGeek, thanks for all the great info about keeping chlorine at 7.5% of CYA, how certain types of chlorine raise CYA and calcium hardness, etc. You say that you just add enough chlorine each day to amke up for loss, keeping the level right around 3-5PPM. But don't you have to also periodically shock (raise chlorine to above 10 ppm) to 'burn off' the combined chlorine? Or is that just a myth?
chem geek
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Pool Algae Problem Support - READ FIRST

Postby chem geek » Wed 02 Jun, 2010 00:29

If you properly maintain the appropriate FC for the CYA level then you do not need to shock regularly. You only need to shock if there is an unusual event such as unusually high bather load or a fecal accident or dead animal, etc. I have hardly ever had to shock my pool and the same is true for tens of thousands of members on multiple pool forums who follow the methods described in the Pool School .
Peggy

Pool Algae Problem Support - READ FIRST

Postby Peggy » Wed 02 Jun, 2010 10:00

I have small black spots on the side and bottem of my pool. They are like little dots. I can scrape off
the tops with my nail. I am guessing this is algae, never had this before. It is a plaster pool size
20 by 40. We have all chems blanced and the pool is clear. It is hot here in Texas and the water temp.
is 90 degrees. HELP.
Peggy
chem geek
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Pool Algae Problem Support - READ FIRST

Postby chem geek » Wed 02 Jun, 2010 10:10

This sounds like it could be black algae. This only develops if the pool has had too low a Free Chlorine (FC) level relative to the Cyanuric Acid (CYA) level for an extended period of time. Read the Pool School link I gave in the previous post including the article there on Defeating Algae. Note that for Black Algae you not only shock the pool, but need to regularly brush the algae to knock off the heads as you are doing to expose the deeper algae to high chlorine levels to kill it.

You should get yourself your own good test kit, the Taylor K-2006 here or the TF-100 here .
pooltec

Pool Algae Problem Support - READ FIRST

Postby pooltec » Tue 08 Jun, 2010 13:02

Have an algae problem in the pool? Check this out! This is the lastest product from Aquatron called Cobia.

It cleans, scrubs, and as well as sanitizes your pool at the same time. You can practically sleep for a month and come back later to find out that your pool is still sparkling blue. Zero maintainance!

Chlorine On Board Integrated Automation (C.O.B.I.A.)

C.O.B.I.A. system uses a compact electrolytic cell to produce chlorine on-site, from sodium chloride (salt) present in the pool. This process of pool chlorination occurs as pool water passes between a series of titanium plates which make up the cell. These plates have low current passing between them causing an electro-chemical reaction leading to the production of chlorine.

How does the Cobia system work? Turn on the power supply and the robot will begin to clean and chlorinate the pool. Each day, this robot will work on its own without touching any buttons. The multi-function user interface is located on the power supply which displays the chlorination time and lets the user know the system status. The interface alerts the user when salt levels are too high or low. The interface has two separate LED�s indicating when the system is in cleaning and/or chlorinating mode(s).



Features

•H2O + Salt + COBIA = sparkling clear pool with naturally chlorinated water
•Totally independent from the pool filter or pressure line
•No hoses or connections
•Reduces energy and chemical costs by approximately 50 percent
•Easy to remove 2 micron filter bag collects sand, silt, or leaves
•Saves energy costs reducing use of pump and filter
•Lightweight and easy to maneuver
•Keeps pool water softer, cleaner, and fully sanitized all at the touch of a button
•Operates on a low salt level (3,000 ppm) which is less than a human tear
•No more storing and transporting extra sanitizing chemicals
•No more damaged hair, red eyes, irritated skin, and color faded bathing suits
•Pool size: Up to 40,000 gallons
•Input power: 115/230 VAC, 50-60 Hz
•Total output power: 12-32 VDC, 198 Watts
•Chlorine: 16 grams per hour
•Expected cell life: 5,000 hours
•2 year / 300 cycles manufacturer warranty
•Chlorinator: 2 year / 8,000 hours manufacturer warranty
floridapooltech
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Pool Algae Problem Support - READ FIRST

Postby floridapooltech » Fri 06 Aug, 2010 20:00

@ Pooltec:

I don't believe this system is what the average consumer is looking for for many reasons (read on):

1. Pool owners want something that will make pool maintenance easier. A MOUNTED salt system with a separate automatic pool cleaner both linked to the timer is EASIER. A pool cleaner with a built in salt system that you manually have to control is not.

2. A salt system that lasts 10,000 hours with a 3 year warranty for less than $800 with a pool cleaner for $300 with a 2 year warranty that operates all by itself without human assistance is much better than an $1800 system that you have to manually operate...(oh, and the COBIA has half the life expectancy might I add)

3. When a salt cell goes bad on a salt chlorinator, all you have to do is unscrew 2 unions, then swap them out. The same goes for cleaning it. What happens when you need to service or replace parts on this huge machine??? Still haven't convinced me of it's effectiveness yet.

4. This forum post was regarding an algae problem. I don't think anyone in this post asked for an advertisement of a pool cleaner with an onboard salt disaster. Please keep this forum to a "help-only". We run a store yet we still don't go advertising all over the place! Help the pool owners out, that is what they're here for. :thumbup:
Florida Pool Tech is a Florida certified service company headquartered in Tampa, Florida employing the best technicians and installers in the industry! Vist us at http://www.floridapooltech.com

Specializing in pool service and pool repair
loveaz
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Pool Algae Problem Support - READ FIRST

Postby loveaz » Sun 03 Oct, 2010 18:21

3. When a salt cell goes bad on a salt chlorinator, all you have to do is unscrew 2 unions, then swap them out. The same goes for cleaning it. What happens when you need to service or replace parts on this huge machine??? Still haven't convinced me of it's effectiveness yet.


I do not get this.. All you have to do is swap out 2 unions?
floridapooltech
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Pool Algae Problem Support - READ FIRST

Postby floridapooltech » Sun 03 Oct, 2010 18:23

loveaz wrote:
3. When a salt cell goes bad on a salt chlorinator, all you have to do is unscrew 2 unions, then swap them out. The same goes for cleaning it. What happens when you need to service or replace parts on this huge machine??? Still haven't convinced me of it's effectiveness yet.


I do not get this.. All you have to do is swap out 2 unions?


No, there should be two union nuts (one on each side of the cell). When you remove the old cell, a new cell will fit in the existing space.
Florida Pool Tech is a Florida certified service company headquartered in Tampa, Florida employing the best technicians and installers in the industry! Vist us at http://www.floridapooltech.com

Specializing in pool service and pool repair
Renee

Pool algea

Postby Renee » Sat 30 Apr, 2011 18:36

Hi last year I bought a house and found out that they left the swimming pool green. It was in late June after a freezing winter that we discovered the problem. I was able to remove it but it came back periodically so in august I decided to not to anything to it until this year. So I closed in late October the way they said to me at the store. I want to replace the sand. Do I need to wash the incide walls of the filter? If yes with what and if I already changed the sand, what can I do?

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