Pretty blue water turned pretty green after chlorine

Stains on the pool surfaces, pool equipment
or on the swimmers, or off-color swimming pool
water. Discolored but clear pool water.
dannalong
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My Pool: 15 x 42 intex easy set up pool
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Pretty blue water turned pretty green after chlorine

Postby dannalong » Sun 05 Jul, 2009 14:11

I found out the hard way that I have metals in my water. I have already add the needed chemicals in my pool, stablizer and conditioner, chlorine, etc - Even added the hth metal control chemcial and let it sit for 3 days before I added the stablizer and chlorine.

My filter is still showing "rust" colored stains but it is getting better. I firmly believe that I didn't get out all the metals when I began added chlorine thus leaving me with a pretty green water because of the reaction of chlorine and metals.

Will the metal control chemical work with chlorine in pool? I've been told no. I haven't added any more water to the pool - don't want to.

I've been told to get the chlorine down to 0 and then add more metal control and let it sit for 3 days. My problem is, I know I will get algea. Tried this already. The sides and floor got slippery.

So - do I add metal control now and let the filter continue to run (it has been running for 7 days straight).

Like I said, the water is clear and "greenish" - but I'm missing my pretty green water.

All other levels of the pool are great. Don't want to waste product by adding the metal control but know that i need to get the metals out.

Pool: Easy set up pool 15x42.

I have taken out the pool round chlorine floater - the water is improving with my chlorine levels decreasing. Yet, I don't want the chlorine levels to go to 0 because then algea can and will set in.

I have been also thinking about getting algea free from walmart as to prevent any algea from forming when the chlorine levels go lower. Is this even a good idea?


chem geek
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Pretty blue water turned pretty green after chlorine

Postby chem geek » Sun 05 Jul, 2009 14:33

When lowering the FC to zero for a metal treatment, one can certainly use a supplemental algaecide such as PolyQuat 60 to help prevent or slow down algae growth during the treatment. Obviously, you don't want to use an algaecide that contains copper since that's a metal that will only exacerbate the potential for staining.
dannalong
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Posts: 6
Joined: Fri 03 Jul, 2009 07:33
My Pool: 15 x 42 intex easy set up pool
Location: Edna, Texas

Pretty blue water turned pretty green after chlorine

Postby dannalong » Sun 05 Jul, 2009 15:52

Thanks Chem Geek.

So . . from your post I gather the ONLY time to add the metal control is when the FC gets "O"? If I add it any other time, the metal control won't work.

If my filter is still running orangish / rusty looking, this does mean I still have metals - right? In addition to the filter, the clear plastic pumps are turning rusty brown as well.

Do you know if the hth algea free chemical contains "metals"? When can I add the algea chemical? Now, before the chlorine gets anylower?

Since I have a high chlorine level now (like the test strips show dark deep purple); there is no way I have algea right?
chem geek
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Pretty blue water turned pretty green after chlorine

Postby chem geek » Sun 05 Jul, 2009 23:13

No, I didn't mean to imply that you can only use a metal sequestrant when the chlorine is zero -- that isn't true. It's just that some metal control products, including ascorbic acid, will lower the chlorine level and are reducing agents to help dissolve existing metal stains. If you have iron, then the chlorine will oxidize it so to reduce it back to something a metal sequestrant can attach to, you need the chlorine to be low when adding a reducing agent (ascorbic acid or some metal free products).

So the answer depends on exactly what you are adding. If the directions on your particular product say to lower the chlorine level, then it needs to be lowered to be effective against iron. For copper and other metals, it doesn't matter.

A filter with orange/rusty appearance does sound like iron.

If you have a high Free Chlorine (FC) level relative to your Cyanuric Acid (CYA) level, then you won't have algae growing. Roughly speaking, if the FC is at least 7.5% of the CYA level, and certainly at least 5% of the CYA level, then you won't have green algae growing since chlorine can kill the algae faster than it can grow at this FC/CYA ratio. You can't look at the FC alone to know -- if the CYA is high, then algae can still grow. This happens in saltwater chlorine generator (SWG) pools, for example, if they only have 2 or 3 ppm FC with 80 ppm CYA -- algae can still grow unless the FC is 4 ppm.
dannalong
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Posts: 6
Joined: Fri 03 Jul, 2009 07:33
My Pool: 15 x 42 intex easy set up pool
Location: Edna, Texas

Pretty blue water turned pretty green after chlorine

Postby dannalong » Mon 06 Jul, 2009 10:27

Thanks chem geek for the response.

I took out the floating basket with chlorine tabs in it yesterday morning. I am trying to lower my chlorine levels just a bit because they are extremely high. The dark purple color on the strip shows the chlorine is "way high". My CYA levels are way up there too.

When I took my pool water sample to the pool place on Thursday afternoon, they tested the water for iron and copper. Said I didn't have any. I feel confident I have something though - because the filter is still turning "orangish" - although when I change the filter and clean off the used one, the orange stuff comes off and the water running through it is now "orangish".

Called the pool place this morning - she advised I continue to run the pump until the filter comes out clean. Keep the chlorine high as it is - she also advised I add 18 ounces of algecide; just in case there is an algea of a small quantity, it will now be resolved. Although I don't believe I have algea.

In your opinion, chem geek - what metal control product should I start using again. I have a bottle of the hth metal control - this is what is said about the product.

[[u]i]HTH® High metal content in pool water can cause staining and discolored water. HTH® Metal Control is a mild acid used to remove iron, copper, manganese and other metals from the water. It also removes metal stains and reduces the amount of calcium carbonate (scale) deposited on pool surfaces. So in addition to removing metal stains and metal build-up, it provides a strong defense, preventing colored water and stains from forming.

Application
Add directly to your pool water, concentrating (if applicable) on affected areas.

Dosage / Frequency
Add 1 quart per 10,000 gallons of water for every ppm of metal.

If metal concentration exceeds 2 ppm, add Clarifier or Super Concentrated Clarifier in addition to the metal control.

Safety
Read and follow all label directions and warnings carefully.

Useful Tips
Add in the evening
Use in addition to Clarifier or Super Concentrated Clarifier if metal concentration exceeds 2 ppm

Product Details

Contains Diphosphonic Acid
Sequestering and chelating agent
chem geek
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Pretty blue water turned pretty green after chlorine

Postby chem geek » Mon 06 Jul, 2009 13:45

The active ingredient is HEDP which is a better metal sequestrant than some other products based on EDTA. It's a fine product to use. If you want to follow their advice and have the chlorine lower, then you can use a PolyQuat 60 algaecide to prevent algae growth in the meantime. You can also learn more about treating metal stains and metals in the water here using an ascorbic acid treatment (again, also using PolyQuat 60 as an algaecide to prevent algae growth).

The sequence would be to add lots of PolyQuat 60 and let the chlorine get low (< 1 ppm FC), then add the ascorbic acid, see stains and water color clear up, then add metal sequestrant, then SLOWLY bring back up the chlorine level making sure the pH doesn't rise too high. The metal sequestrant will then need to be added in a weekly maintenance dose unless you have your water changed (diluted) with water that doesn't contain metal (i.e. not well water).
dannalong
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Posts: 6
Joined: Fri 03 Jul, 2009 07:33
My Pool: 15 x 42 intex easy set up pool
Location: Edna, Texas

Pretty blue water turned pretty green after chlorine

Postby dannalong » Mon 06 Jul, 2009 14:08

I have gone ahead now and added the algeacide. Well, the pool is worse and cloudy.

Hmmm - another $20.00 down the drain.


What now????
chem geek
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Pretty blue water turned pretty green after chlorine

Postby chem geek » Mon 06 Jul, 2009 17:40

What kind of algaecide? Was it an inexpensive linear quat? If so, then this can cause foaming and could cloud. If it was PolyQuat 60 (ingredient is Poly{oxyethylene(dimethyliminio)Ethylene (dimethyliminio)ethylene dichloride} ), then this is viscous and thick and takes time to disperse, but I've added it to my pool (doing metal stain reduction in the past) and not had it cloud up. Keep the pump running for a while.

What exactly was the algaecide that you added? When something is specified, such as PolyQuat 60, you can't use another algaecide. Some algaecides contain copper and can turn the water green or stain; others contain sodium bromide and turn your pool into a bromine pool; others are inexpensive linear quats that can foam; others contain ammonium sulfate that produce combined chlorine that smells; etc. All algaecides are not alike.

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