Algae Problems, Green Pool Advice

Algae problems in swimming pool water.
Green (cloudy) water or slimy pool walls.
Black algae. Mustard algae. Pink or white pool mold.
SweetwaterPoolService

Algae Problems, Green Pool Advice

Postby SweetwaterPoolService » Fri 25 Sep, 2009 15:09

It's true, no matter who you are...

Metals enter your pool and dissolve in the water whenever
1) fresh make-up water is added
2) gas heaters are used
3) pool pumps are installed.

Whether it's municipal or well water, metals can be present, then come out of solution in a variety of ways. When the pool is chlorinated, whether with liquid chlorine, dry chlorine, or non-chlorine oxidizer, the chlorine always oxidizes the metals. Iron becomes rust, and copper becomes verdigris, ie stains on the walls and floor of your pool! This is just the beginning to a vicious cycle of the pool water "needing" these metals, removing some of the stain, and placing the oxidized metal back into solution, with the same disheartening finish: discolored pool finish. Never fear, there is help! Treating the pool with stain treatment products, or - more effectively - doing a drain and light acid wash can remove these stains.

There is a drawback to chemical treatments. All pool chemicals leave the pool with a higher TDS (Total Dissolved Solids), and this promotes algae growth. Needless to say, no one wants to swim in a green pool, and the only way to truly lower TDS is to drain water out of the pool and refill with fresh water. When there is a continual algae problem, the TDS and phosphate levels should be tested; however, high phosphate is treatable while high TDS is not.

More information can be obtained by contacting Pool Services


AlanGmyerson

Algae Problems, Green Pool Advice

Postby AlanGmyerson » Fri 25 Sep, 2009 19:31

SweetwaterPoolService wrote: Metals enter your pool and dissolve in the water whenever

3) pool pumps are installed.


Not true.

Adding a Hayward Superpump will not introduce any metals into the pool. The only metal in that pump that will contact the water is a small, high quality stainless steel spring, which does not corrode to any measurable degree. Perhaps a few nanograms per year if you want to get specific.

SweetwaterPoolService wrote:There is a drawback to chemical treatments.


OK, so explain your proposed alternative.

SweetwaterPoolService wrote: All pool chemicals leave the pool with a higher TDS (Total Dissolved Solids), and this promotes algae growth.


Completely untrue.

Ozone is a chemical that does not increase TDS. Hydrogen peroxide does not increase TDS.

It is not true that higher TDS promotes algae growth. It depends on what the TDS consists of. Copper, silver, zinc, sodium, chloride and many others do not promote algae growth. Copper kills algae.

SweetwaterPoolService wrote: When there is a continual algae problem, the TDS and phosphate levels should be tested; however, high phosphate is treatable while high TDS is not.


Most people who say to worry about phosphates are way over exaggerating the "problem" to sell expensive phosphate removers or to try to avoid responsibility when they fail to keep a customer's pool algae free.
AlanGmyerson

Algae Problems, Green Pool Advice

Postby AlanGmyerson » Fri 25 Sep, 2009 19:41

SweetwaterPoolService wrote: All pool chemicals leave the pool with a higher TDS (Total Dissolved Solids)


Dihydrogen monoxide is a pool chemical that does not increase TDS.
nocturnalsheep
Pool Enthusiast
Pool Enthusiast
Posts: 18
Joined: Mon 24 Aug, 2009 17:00
Location: Seattle

Algae Problems, Green Pool Advice

Postby nocturnalsheep » Mon 05 Oct, 2009 14:03

AlanGmyerson wrote:
SweetwaterPoolService wrote:

Dihydrogen monoxide is a pool chemical that does not increase TDS.



Unfortunately the water most people add to their pool is not pure H2O and thus does add TDS. ;)

So is this one of those phosphate treatments that involves using a copper based chemical, elevating the copper levels which in turn causes you to treat the elevated copper levels with a phosphate based chemical, elevating the phosphate levels?

I don't know about this...it sounds like sweetwater pool service doesn't really know anything about water chemistry. It seems like you should do a little more research on what causes elevated levels of metals in water (such as a low pH corroding the heat exchanger) and algae blooms.

-Danny

"the pool whisperer"
-Danny
Water Analyst/Retail Sales Consultant

"the pool whisperer"

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