Hand Rail Installation

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Lynn V

Hand Rail Installation

Postby Lynn V » Mon 02 Aug, 2010 11:47

I need installation details on how to install a SR Smith DMS-100A hand rail - can anyone help me?


floridapooltech
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Hand Rail Installation

Postby floridapooltech » Mon 02 Aug, 2010 15:55

typically, handrails are installed by drilling into the concrete/gunite, then using the supplied bolts, fastening them to the deck/pool wall. Just make sure you put the gushing plates on before you fasten them, or you'll be taking it apart again!
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Guest

Hand Rail Installation

Postby Guest » Tue 09 Apr, 2013 00:56

I want to install a pair of SR Smith 30" Figure 4 Handrail stainless steel 304 Grade.49 Wall residential F4H-101. I also have 4 4"bronze rail anchor socket and 4 round escutcheon stainless steel . How do I go to install on top of deck of an inground swimming pool.? Thank you. Aurora Rosello
TSH Tech

Hand Rail Installation

Postby TSH Tech » Thu 11 Apr, 2013 00:33

How confident do you feel about drilling concrete deck, measuring, mixing/pouring deck cement? Installation is a two person job.
Take a look at this video and note the details of the installation, placement and what the installer has to say:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HbeReUNm-QU

If you have a concrete deck, take the rail and with an assistant place the rail where you want it. Make sure your decision is final. Have an assistant hold the rail where you want it, then take a black marker pen and draw circles on the deck around the tubes that insert into the anchor holes. These are the placement holes you are going to drill for the anchors.

If you do not have a Roto-Drill/Hammer with concrete drill bits and chisels, you are going to need one, or at least rent one. A jack hammer is too big for installing rails and will only ruin your deck and installation, you are going to need a concrete capable drill/hammer that can make holes just large enough to slide the anchors inside. The holes required must be big enough to fit the anchors and large enough to pour hard setting cement mix in between. This is important! The holes must never be larger than the outside diameter of the escutcheon cover.

I've found this method to work best rather than try and fit to size the anchors to the rails; What I do is place the escutcheons on first! Slide them up high and tape them into position with blue painters tape to keep them from sliding and falling into the way. Some Figure 4's can be a pain, because the closest 'short' rail anchor point facing the pool does not allow for the escutcheon to be tucked up very high and out of the way for the install. Then install the anchors onto the rails, position the bolt(as seen on the video) so they are in line and easy to get to with the rail. Tighten them snug. I then use the cardboard the rails came packaged and using a box cutter, make a simple frame to hold the rails up. If it's a Figure 4 rail, the weight of the rail wants to bring the whole thing into the pool, so I cut up a cardboard "prop" to tuck and fit under the rail to keep it from wanting to fall into the water. To keep the rail upright from falling on it's side, that's where I use the make-shift cardboard frames to hold up the rail while the concrete sets and dries. I use blue painters tape to affix them onto the rails, any other strong type of tape always leaves tape residue or marring marks on nice new shiny rails.

So, after the holes are drilled out, and it looks like the rails and anchors slide in with ease, the hard set concrete mix is ready, an assistant places in the rails anchor first into the holes, then the concrete is poured in between the concrete deck and the anchors. The tighten bolts must never be covered in cement and must be level with the deck for future disconnection. I allow 2 days to cure with the props and frames still holding the rails up. By the third day, when it looks like it's set, then I can take the cardboard out, undo the blue painters tape holding up the escutcheons, let the covers fall into place so the install looks complete. And by the 4th day, it should be ready to use.

Does this sound like fun? If not, you can always call several pool contractors for estimates on the installation. You already have the rails, so you would only be paying their labor rate, small use of cement and you would know it would be installed well.
Hope this helps!
Aurora Rosello

Hand Rail Installation

Postby Aurora Rosello » Fri 12 Apr, 2013 10:23

I thank you so much for the detail response, my nephew and I will be installing the rails in a few days. I will let you know the results.
ggordog

Hand Rail Installation

Postby ggordog » Sun 08 Jun, 2014 19:39

I am installing a pool rail in an in ground pool. I want to core drill the 2 holes and make a temporary support to hold the rail in place. I will grout it in place with the escutcheons taped up on the rail. Is there any reason this won't work. If at any time it needs to be removed it can be cut off at deck level, core drilled again, filled and finished. What do you think?
ggordog

Hand Rail Installation

Postby ggordog » Mon 16 Jun, 2014 20:18

ggordog wrote:I am installing a pool rail in an in ground pool. I want to core drill the 2 holes and make a temporary support to hold the rail in place. I will grout it in place with the escutcheons taped up on the rail. WHAT IS THE BEST AND STRONGEST MATERIAL TO " GROUT THEM IN?? At any time it needs to be removed it can be cut off at deck level, core drilled again, filled and finished. What do you think?
TSH Tech

Hand Rail Installation

Postby TSH Tech » Thu 19 Jun, 2014 02:21

Grout is too brittle, and will crack. Then the rail will come out.

If you want this as a temporary measure, expect allot of wobble and not much usefulness when the whole thing is pulled out by a swimmer using it.

Short of welding a make-shift rail to a forklift blade and parking the forklift near the pool.... I really don't see how a temporary rail could be effective. :wtf:

I'm sure it can be done, but my skillset is not geared for temporary measures where somebody could get hurt, it's either do it correctly, or don't do it at all. But that's just me.
ggordog

Hand Rail Installation

Postby ggordog » Fri 20 Jun, 2014 07:18

Hi TSH, thanks for getting back with me on this install. This is a permanent installation. Perhaps I wasn't clear about the temporary part. The temporary support is to hold the rail in place so the hi strength concrete, epoxy grout or what ever I use can set up. I see no reason to use the expensive anchor sockets
ggordog

Hand Rail Installation

Postby ggordog » Wed 25 Jun, 2014 16:37

ggordog wrote:Hi TSH, thanks for getting back with me on this install. This is a permanent installation. Perhaps I wasn't clear about the temporary part. The temporary support is to hold the rail in place so the hi strength concrete, epoxy grout or what ever I use can set up. I see no reason to use the expensive anchor sockets

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