Pool Motor Overheating - High Amps

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captjake
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Pool Motor Overheating - High Amps

Postby captjake » Tue 31 Aug, 2010 21:48

Thanks for your input, but I'm not ready to run 75' of wire through the attic only for a test at 240V. For now, I want to concentrate on fixing the problem at 115V.

This setup has been in place for 7 years. There is no damage to the wire from the main panel to the timer.

Pump pressure is about 10.


Allen G Myerson

Pool Motor Overheating - High Amps

Postby Allen G Myerson » Tue 31 Aug, 2010 22:46

You don't have to go through the attic. Just run the wires directly from the circuit breaker to the pump via the easiest and most direct route. You will remove them after the test.

At least try a bench test at 240 volts near the circuit breaker like you did with 120 volts.

I'm thinking that this could be a problem with your neutral wiring.
captjake
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Pool Motor Overheating - High Amps

Postby captjake » Wed 01 Sep, 2010 07:30

Attic is the shortest route. Panel and pump are on opposite sides of the property.

Just disconnected the timer and light transformer. Hard wired to the motor direct. Still drawing 19A at the motor under load.

If you're thinking the neutral is bad, where in the circuit do you think it is originating?
Allen G Myerson

Pool Motor Overheating - High Amps

Postby Allen G Myerson » Wed 01 Sep, 2010 10:23

For the neutrals, it could be on the supply side. Ask the power company to check to see if it's on the supply. If the supply is good, get an electrician to check your system.

Can you do a bench test at 240 volts?

For a 240-volt test under load, I'm thinking you could just run the wire through the house and out a door or window to get to the pump. It's just for the test, so it doesn't matter where it goes.

I'm not sure what is causing the problem. Checking the current draw at 240 volts would help diagnose the problem. If you use much less total power (volts x amps) at 240 volts, then that would indicate a problem with the neutral.

Does the pump sound like it's running properly or does it sound like it's straining?

Are you having any other electrical problems? Things like lights flickering, or increasing or decreasing in brightness?
Allen G Myerson

Pool Motor Overheating - High Amps

Postby Allen G Myerson » Wed 01 Sep, 2010 10:29

Also, if you're going to rewire, I recommend that you switch over to 240 volts. It's better to run larger appliances at 240 volts to better distribute the power loads. You want to reduce the use of the neutral as much as possible.
captjake
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Pool Motor Overheating - High Amps

Postby captjake » Wed 01 Sep, 2010 10:37

Can I still run 10 awg for a 240V setup. If I'm going to spend money on this, I want to do it once and correctly.

What size breaker will I need for the 240V hook in?
Allen G Myerson

Pool Motor Overheating - High Amps

Postby Allen G Myerson » Wed 01 Sep, 2010 14:03

Running on 240 volts requires less current than using 120 volts. Therefore, you can use a smaller wire size for 240 volts than you would use for 120 volts.

A # 12 should be sufficient for 240 volts. I would go to # 10 for 120 volts. # 10 is a larger wire and would handle either 120 volts or 240 volts.

What else will be on the same circuit, and how much current will it require?
What is the one-way distance?

If only the pump will be on the circuit, and the circuit (one way) is less than 100 feet, you could use #12 with a 15-amp breaker, or #10 with a 25-amp breaker for 240-volt service.

If you want to run other things on the same circuit, then you will need to recalculate based on the total current load.

General notes:

1) Smaller wire size numbers indicate larger wire diameters.
2) Use copper conductors, not aluminum.
3) I am not an electrician. Get advice from a licensed, qualified electrician before deciding on what to do.
Allen G Myerson

Pool Motor Overheating - High Amps

Postby Allen G Myerson » Wed 01 Sep, 2010 14:30

If you currently have a wire size of # 12, then you should not have a circuit breaker larger than 10 amps for 120 volts. If you are running 20 amps and not tripping the breaker, then your breaker is either too big or defective.

The circuit breaker always needs to be sized equal to or smaller than the maximum allowable ampacity of the wires.

http://www.csgnetwork.com/wiresizecalc.html
http://www.gorhamschaffler.com/wire_siz ... lator.html
http://www.paigewire.com/pumpWireCalc.htm
Rob W.

Pool Motor Overheating - High Amps

Postby Rob W. » Wed 01 Sep, 2010 15:45

Allen G Myerson wrote:If you currently have a wire size of # 12, then you should not have a circuit breaker larger than 10 amps for 120 volts. If you are running 20 amps and not tripping the breaker, then your breaker is either too big or defective.

The circuit breaker always needs to be sized equal to or smaller than the maximum allowable ampacity of the wires.

http://www.csgnetwork.com/wiresizecalc.html
http://www.gorhamschaffler.com/wire_siz ... lator.html
http://www.paigewire.com/pumpWireCalc.htm


This is incorrect. #12 CU is rated at 25 amps (NEC Table 310-16). It is more than sufficient for this application. If going to 240v, the ampacity will be lower, therefore the wire will still be fine. I would leave it a 120v.

As far as your problem, it sounds like it could be a bad neutral as stated earlier. This would either be at the power company transformer or main connection in your electrical panel. My advice is to hire an electrician to check this.

Rob
Rob W.

Pool Motor Overheating - High Amps

Postby Rob W. » Wed 01 Sep, 2010 15:55

Also, a 20 amp breaker for this pump is the correct size. You could use a 15 amp but the Code allows a 20a (15Ax80%=12A, load is 12.6A so code says you can increase to the next standard size).

AND just because it doesn't trip with a 20 amp load does NOT mean it is defective.

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