How expensive is it to maintain your own pool?

Chlorinating, maintaining the right chlorine levels,
chlorine problems. Dichlor, trichlor, cal hypo, bleach,
granules, chlorine pucks and chlorine sticks.
Poolnoob
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How expensive is it to maintain your own pool?

Postby Poolnoob » Thu 02 Dec, 2010 07:39

Thanks Richard, I was looking for a way for my pool to become more sustainable, and to use less chemicals like chlorine and stuff and I found this thing greenerpool.com. It mentions that nothing goes in or comes out of the tube. AND it saves 70% on chlorine. so that means that my family can be healthier!!! I'm very amazed by this and seriously thinking about buying one for my pool. I even asked the e-mail on the website if it uses copper and they said no, so it wont stain my pool. I'm glad I found it so that I can only spend 25% on the amount of chlorine. This sounds pretty good, let me know what you think...

Thanks,
PN


chem geek
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How expensive is it to maintain your own pool?

Postby chem geek » Thu 02 Dec, 2010 12:55

For a typical residential pool, such supplemental oxidation systems won't reduce the amount of chlorine you need because the bather load is so low that most of the chlorine isn't consumed by oxidizing bather waste. Most chlorine in an outdoor residential pool is lost from breakdown from sunlight. Your choices to prevent that are having a higher Cyanuric Acid (CYA) level or using a mostly opaque pool cover.

Another possible choice, in addition to using a higher CYA level, is to supplement algae prevention so that you can target a lower Free Chlorine (FC) level. There is no perfect solution here, but using 50 ppm Borates can substantially take the edge off of algae growth, though it's a larger one-time cost for a pool your size. It would take around 95 pounds of Boric Acid to get to 50 ppm in a 40,000 gallon pool. At $81 for a 50 pound bag that's around $160 (plus shipping). Another option would be the weekly use of PolyQuat 60 algicide at around $16 per quart, but requires 2-4 ounces per 10,000 gallons so for a 40,000 gallon pool that's 8-16 ounces or $4-$8 per week for your pool. Another option would be the use of a phosphate remover, but that can also be pricey if your phosphate level is high. And then, of course, there's copper ions, but that has to be carefully managed to prevent staining (and can give blond hair a greenish tint). These options may let you cut your chlorine target level in half or to one-third at most -- other than the copper ions, probably the Borates have the lowest maintenance cost once you pay the startup price for them since you only need to replenish from dilution. So you could probably have around 3 ppm FC with 80-100 ppm CYA in these pools and have a chlorine demand that is less than 1 ppm FC per day so less than $25 per month in chlorine cost.

The place where supplemental oxidation makes some sense is in high bather-load situations such as in residential spas that are used every day (or in most commercial and public pools). In that case, an ozonator usually cuts chlorine usage in half, but if you don't use the spa a lot (say, only once a week instead), then the ozonator can double the chlorine usage since it can oxidize chlorine to chlorate and also increase the amount of outgassing.

By the way, don't be fooled into thinking that a high Free Chlorine (FC) level means there is a lot of active chlorine in the water. The active chlorine level that does the disinfection, most of the oxidation, prevents algae growth and is what creates disinfection by-products is hypochlorous acid; its amount is proportional to the FC/CYA ratio. If you have 3 ppm FC with 100 ppm CYA, then that's equivalent in active chlorine concentration to a pool with 0.03 ppm FC and no CYA. The FC level itself is only relevant when you look at chlorine capacity so for things like drinking the pool water which is not something you normally do (at least in quantity).

You are going to find all kinds of devices and systems on websites claiming to reduce chlorine usage or be chlorine-free, but don't be misled by them.
Poolnoob
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How expensive is it to maintain your own pool?

Postby Poolnoob » Thu 02 Dec, 2010 12:59

Alright, thanks for the help, ill do some more research and see what ill do!

Thanks again!
fahavi
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How expensive is it to maintain your own pool?

Postby fahavi » Mon 06 Dec, 2010 07:57

As I always said I don't own a pool. But I have my friend who own it. i don't know the exact expenses that they use for maintaining their pool. He just mentioned before that the maintenance is very high which makes me discouraged to put a pool for my own.
Poolnoob
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How expensive is it to maintain your own pool?

Postby Poolnoob » Mon 06 Dec, 2010 08:10

Yea, I agree, my expenses were really high too but I bought this thing that makes my chlorine and stuff last 70% longer, its pretty cool, it also kills the algae and stuff like that.
dalehileman
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Spendthrift

Postby dalehileman » Mon 06 Dec, 2010 12:01

Fah and PN: Indeed in this country if you choose to posses a pool, judging from the price of upkeep the rest of its inhabitants apparently consider you wealthy or at least a spendthrift
chem geek
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How expensive is it to maintain your own pool?

Postby chem geek » Mon 06 Dec, 2010 20:55

Let's see here...

You wrote the following on December 2nd:

Poolnoob wrote:Thanks Richard, I was looking for a way for my pool to become more sustainable, and to use less chemicals like chlorine and stuff and I found this thing greenerpool.com. It mentions that nothing goes in or comes out of the tube. AND it saves 70% on chlorine. so that means that my family can be healthier!!! I'm very amazed by this and seriously thinking about buying one for my pool. I even asked the e-mail on the website if it uses copper and they said no, so it wont stain my pool. I'm glad I found it so that I can only spend 25% on the amount of chlorine. This sounds pretty good, let me know what you think...

and then you wrote the following on December 6th:

Poolnoob wrote:Yea, I agree, my expenses were really high too but I bought this thing that makes my chlorine and stuff last 70% longer, its pretty cool, it also kills the algae and stuff like that.

So in those intervening 4 days you bought the GreenerPool product (at $249 for inline; $165 for floater), had it installed inline in your PVC plumbing (or did you get the version similar to a floating dispenser?), and have already measured a change in daily chlorine usage? Did you lower your target Free Chlorine (FC) level at all? Where do you live? In many areas of the country, the weather has changed and the days are no longer sunny and the temperature is cooler such that chlorine demand drops rapidly anyway. I'm beginning to smell something very fishy here...
Common Sense Is An Uncommon Virtue

How expensive is it to maintain your own pool?

Postby Common Sense Is An Uncommon Virtue » Thu 05 May, 2011 19:48

I bet that if you stop letting the dog swim in the pool, your chlorine levels will not drop so drastically. Dogs carry loads of dirt and dander, in addition to the hair they shed, which drastically alters the water chemistry. It also clogs the filter and pump baskets much faster. I know it's fun to let the family dog join in on the fun, but you are paying a hefty price for it. Take him to the beach or lake instead.

Also...direct sunslight burns chlorine fast. Use a cover on the pool when it's not in use....and tell the kids to pee in the house...not in the pool...Lol!! :thumbup: :lol:
opensky

How expensive is it to maintain your own pool?

Postby opensky » Thu 29 Sep, 2011 13:53

One way to reduce chlorine usage is to shower before entering the pool. The less organic and nitrogen-rich dirt and chemicals (make up, etc.) you bring into the pool, the less chlorine you use. You can save up to 30% chlorine usage by showering before getting in the pool. At Open Sky , we have some examples of inexpensive outdoor showers that can be installed by the pool.
czechmate
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How expensive is it to maintain your own pool?

Postby czechmate » Thu 29 Sep, 2011 15:48

opensky wrote:One way to reduce chlorine usage is to shower before entering the pool. The less organic and nitrogen-rich dirt and chemicals (make up, etc.) you bring into the pool, the less chlorine you use. You can save up to 30% chlorine usage by showering before getting in the pool.


Save 30% of chlorine? Hardly.
Not even if you did not shower in the morning already.
Besides, it is relative to number of people using the pool.
So for a couple with 2 kids it hardly has a merit.
Remember, that there is a slue of other elements demanding keeping chlorination relative to CYA to prevent algae start. (Human body sweat and skin peel is only one small part).

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